Back lit

Acrylic on Paper  14 x 10 ins

Another exploration with interactive acrylic and ‘drawing with a brush’.  Here there was time, about 50 minutes in all, to introduce white with the umber and go beyond a basic wash-in to add a little loose modelling on the back and a touch of detail in the profile.

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Broad daylight

10 x 14 ins: Acrylic on paper

This is a very quick value study going straight for the light, middle and dark tones and their relationship to each other across the figure and through the space. Very immediate using a big brush with just white and umber acrylic paint…strong daylight falling onto the model from the studio window…and little time to think!  Is it a painting…or a drawing in paint?

Quick draw

A3: Charcoal and wash on paper

These are all fairly quick drawings, the two lower poses being about five minutes each, and the feinter washy ones at the top were one or two minutes.

It’s amazing how much can be done in a very short time to capture the gesture and mood of a pose.  There isn’t time to think. You just have to go for it and be spontaneous.

I had a good day today and enjoyed working quite fast.

Head

 

A3: Charoal and wash on paper

I’ve never focused on just the the head before but this time I found it interesting to do that, and I like how it turned out, even though there’s very little detail, so it isn’t really a portrait, but I think it does capture something of the character and elegance of this particular model.

Portraiture is another discipline entirely, and one I’d certainly like to explore and develop…

Fast and loose

A3: Charcoal and wash on paper

I let the proportions get a bit out of hand here and was conscious of working quickly and relying on the values and the dark wash to do the work and make an impact. So now, without reference to the model, I can’t be sure where it’s all gone off, but the left leg certainly looks way longer than the right.

I think I need to concentrate on some disciplined measuring in my next few sessions to bring my eye and hand back in. They’re slipping!

Rare features

A3: Charcoal & wash on paper

Returning to drawing media after the oil wash-ins I feel the influence of the painting approach on my drawing. The tonal washes are bolder and looser and I really enjoy combining the line and wash like this.

And I even put in some facial features. Which is rare.

Seeing Red

Oil on canvas board: 8 x 6 ins

I love the challenge of a dramatic pose like this. The red lines were a way of redefining and checking my drawing. The use of a strong Cadmium red was an experiment, partly to make the marks stand out against the Umber so I could see the alterations clearly but also to increase the drama and energy of the image.

I made some other studies and colour notes of this pose so I may paint a larger, more finished painting from these at some point…

Wash on Wash off

6×8 ins: Oil on canvas board

This was an experiment with an Umber wash-in, which is a traditional way to begin an oil painting, though I think how I’ve done it probably isn’t very traditional. But it is very washy.  And drippy. There’s a wonderful freedom working this way which is essentially drawing with a brush. The oil paint, thinned with genuine turps, can be pulled and pushed around for quite a long time before it dries. This would be the first layer of a painting, describing the general shapes and values.  The next stage would be to paint the scene again on top of this layer again using monochrome values, but with opaque paint. The third stage, when that second layer is dry, is to add colour, and finally the highlights. Oil paint can take days to dry so this is potentially quite a long process.