Back lit

Acrylic on Paper  14 x 10 ins

Another exploration with interactive acrylic and ‘drawing with a brush’.  Here there was time, about 50 minutes in all, to introduce white with the umber and go beyond a basic wash-in to add a little loose modelling on the back and a touch of detail in the profile.

Advertisements

Between the lines

A3: Charcoal and wash

I was more deliberate about the design of this than I usually am when drawing one pose on top of another.  I included straight lines suggested by the interior of the studio as a deliberate contrast with the organic flowing contours of the model. By extending washes into some of these more abstract grid lines I was aiming to break up the composition further and increase the general ambiguity and transparency and the blurring of apparent boundaries between body and space, self and other…

Stillness moving

A3: Charcoal on paper

Here’s a very recent ‘composite’ drawing, a series of short poses drawn on top of each other, which has unwittingly become a bit of a trademark. I do them to save time and paper but that’s clearly not all. I really enjoy the inability to control the end result and the illusion of various figures appearing to relate with each other in fleeting moments…self seeming to dance with self.

I’m exploring this effect of ‘stillness moving’ in painting as well as drawing. It’s the closest I’ve come to expressing, through art, something of the nondual nature of experience…this oneness appearing to be many.

Very Laid Back

A3: Charcoal & wash on paper

Here’s a bit of full-on foreshortening to kick off the New Year!

After a long break of no life drawing since summer I treated myself to four full days of  intensive untutored practice last week, so I feel like I’m just about back in gear.  And what an excellent way to spend that time between Boxing Day and New Year’s eve!

Stretching curling turning

A3: Charcoal and wash on paper

I enjoy the challenge of foreshortened poses and with this one it just seemed right to emphasise the length and movement through the body by framing the head fairly tightly into the top corner so the model’s torso and legs seem to unravel and extend down the page…or is she maybe curling up…or turning over?

Leaning back

A3: Charcoal and wash on paper

I’ve taken a break from life drawing for a while and have been painting, mainly figure paintings but also landscapes, and now I’m almost ready to come back to this. I never intend to stop but my pattern seems to be to draw regularly for a few months and then have a few weeks off. So far I’ve always come back to it with renewed enthusiasm…

Meanwhile this drawing is one I did earlier. The diagonal pose goes off the page anchoring it to the edges of the paper and I like sense of the light coming in from the right and the dark shadow on the left emphasising the weight leaning on her right arm.

Big man crawling

A3: Carbon pencil on paper

By taking the figure beyond the frame I was aiming to convey a sense of his size and weight and a feeling of slow or restricted movement.  The wet carbon pencil is bold.  It makes fat black indelible lines and there’s no going back so it feels more risky than a soft malleable medium like charcoal. I’m pleased with how it turned out.

Mediamix

A3: Charcoal on Paper

The cut-out effect is the result of photographing the drawing in poor lighting, which made the whole thing a bit grey, then erasing the background area in Photoshop to lighten it.

I’ve sometimes done this on previous posts to clean them up a bit around the corners but it’s more obvious and deliberate-looking here, and I like how the soft grey links the three individual poses together to create an apparent group of figures.

Headless

A3: Charcoal on paper

So, having said I might like to focus a bit more on the head what do I do here? I leave it really vague and instead get all involved in the fascinating contrast between the light and shade on the shoulder and torso until the pose is over and there’s no time left.  What can you do? To me the head just wasn’t the most engaging aspect of this pose, in fact it seemed almost invisible, as if a veil of light had been thrown over it obscuring any detail.